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Luminaire Shelf Supports: Recently I needed some supports for a pair of shelves. I toyed with the idea of using glass blocks, then decided that it would be fun to make something a little more elegant. First, I cut a couple pieces of plexiglass and painted the back of one piece with white spray paint. Then, using an X-ACTO knife, I cut out a simple branch-and-leaves design from a scrap of black posterboard. I spray painted it black (so that the color wouldn’t fade) and then sandwiched it between the two pieces of plexiglass. Next, I cut four pieces from an old black shelf, cut a groove to hold the plexiglass, and assembled a small box, leaving the back open. Put a strand of LED christmas lights inside, and presto: a quick and easy set of shelf supports.
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Luminaire Shelf Supports: Recently I needed some supports for a pair of shelves. I toyed with the idea of using glass blocks, then decided that it would be fun to make something a little more elegant. First, I cut a couple pieces of plexiglass and painted the back of one piece with white spray paint. Then, using an X-ACTO knife, I cut out a simple branch-and-leaves design from a scrap of black posterboard. I spray painted it black (so that the color wouldn’t fade) and then sandwiched it between the two pieces of plexiglass. Next, I cut four pieces from an old black shelf, cut a groove to hold the plexiglass, and assembled a small box, leaving the back open. Put a strand of LED christmas lights inside, and presto: a quick and easy set of shelf supports.
Zoom Info

Luminaire Shelf Supports: Recently I needed some supports for a pair of shelves. I toyed with the idea of using glass blocks, then decided that it would be fun to make something a little more elegant. First, I cut a couple pieces of plexiglass and painted the back of one piece with white spray paint. Then, using an X-ACTO knife, I cut out a simple branch-and-leaves design from a scrap of black posterboard. I spray painted it black (so that the color wouldn’t fade) and then sandwiched it between the two pieces of plexiglass. Next, I cut four pieces from an old black shelf, cut a groove to hold the plexiglass, and assembled a small box, leaving the back open. Put a strand of LED christmas lights inside, and presto: a quick and easy set of shelf supports.

Buddha in the TARDIS: We’ve finally found a good spot for our TARDIS bookcase, built back in 2012. Our house has one room with a ledge above the door, and it’s been unused for a while.

Every Cambodian home needs a Buddha, so why not let him travel in style? After all, the Doctor would make a pretty good Buddhist: he’s peaceful, helps others, and comes back again after he dies.

We put our TARDIS bookcase up on the ledge, added some spotlights for the Buddha, and tricked it out with some homemade, backlit shelf supports. A couple Apsara statues add a celebratory touch.

A yoga mat in front of the books turns the whole thing into a nice reading nook.
Zoom Info
Buddha in the TARDIS: We’ve finally found a good spot for our TARDIS bookcase, built back in 2012. Our house has one room with a ledge above the door, and it’s been unused for a while.

Every Cambodian home needs a Buddha, so why not let him travel in style? After all, the Doctor would make a pretty good Buddhist: he’s peaceful, helps others, and comes back again after he dies.

We put our TARDIS bookcase up on the ledge, added some spotlights for the Buddha, and tricked it out with some homemade, backlit shelf supports. A couple Apsara statues add a celebratory touch.

A yoga mat in front of the books turns the whole thing into a nice reading nook.
Zoom Info

Buddha in the TARDIS: We’ve finally found a good spot for our TARDIS bookcase, built back in 2012. Our house has one room with a ledge above the door, and it’s been unused for a while.

Every Cambodian home needs a Buddha, so why not let him travel in style? After all, the Doctor would make a pretty good Buddhist: he’s peaceful, helps others, and comes back again after he dies.

We put our TARDIS bookcase up on the ledge, added some spotlights for the Buddha, and tricked it out with some homemade, backlit shelf supports. A couple Apsara statues add a celebratory touch.

A yoga mat in front of the books turns the whole thing into a nice reading nook.

Wooden Snowflake Christmas Ornaments: Need to make a nice custom gift, but don’t have much time? Here’s a technique I learned, working for Jeff Miller. (Not sure, but I think he picked it up from an old Fine Woodworking article.)Take a few scraps of wood, and cut a 30 degree chamfer on the lower third. Cut a steeper angle on the upper portion, and then slice in a few random grooves. Glue six pieces together, and you’ve now got a piece from which thin slices can be chopped off, just like you’d slice off cookie dough. (You do cut your cookie dough with a band saw, right? Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

One tip: you’ll probably want to use epoxy or another adhesive with good gap-filling qualities, because it’s very hard to get a perfect 30 degree angle, and it’s hard to apply much clamping pressure.
Zoom Info
Wooden Snowflake Christmas Ornaments: Need to make a nice custom gift, but don’t have much time? Here’s a technique I learned, working for Jeff Miller. (Not sure, but I think he picked it up from an old Fine Woodworking article.)Take a few scraps of wood, and cut a 30 degree chamfer on the lower third. Cut a steeper angle on the upper portion, and then slice in a few random grooves. Glue six pieces together, and you’ve now got a piece from which thin slices can be chopped off, just like you’d slice off cookie dough. (You do cut your cookie dough with a band saw, right? Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

One tip: you’ll probably want to use epoxy or another adhesive with good gap-filling qualities, because it’s very hard to get a perfect 30 degree angle, and it’s hard to apply much clamping pressure.
Zoom Info
Wooden Snowflake Christmas Ornaments: Need to make a nice custom gift, but don’t have much time? Here’s a technique I learned, working for Jeff Miller. (Not sure, but I think he picked it up from an old Fine Woodworking article.)Take a few scraps of wood, and cut a 30 degree chamfer on the lower third. Cut a steeper angle on the upper portion, and then slice in a few random grooves. Glue six pieces together, and you’ve now got a piece from which thin slices can be chopped off, just like you’d slice off cookie dough. (You do cut your cookie dough with a band saw, right? Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

One tip: you’ll probably want to use epoxy or another adhesive with good gap-filling qualities, because it’s very hard to get a perfect 30 degree angle, and it’s hard to apply much clamping pressure.
Zoom Info
Wooden Snowflake Christmas Ornaments: Need to make a nice custom gift, but don’t have much time? Here’s a technique I learned, working for Jeff Miller. (Not sure, but I think he picked it up from an old Fine Woodworking article.)Take a few scraps of wood, and cut a 30 degree chamfer on the lower third. Cut a steeper angle on the upper portion, and then slice in a few random grooves. Glue six pieces together, and you’ve now got a piece from which thin slices can be chopped off, just like you’d slice off cookie dough. (You do cut your cookie dough with a band saw, right? Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

One tip: you’ll probably want to use epoxy or another adhesive with good gap-filling qualities, because it’s very hard to get a perfect 30 degree angle, and it’s hard to apply much clamping pressure.
Zoom Info
Wooden Snowflake Christmas Ornaments: Need to make a nice custom gift, but don’t have much time? Here’s a technique I learned, working for Jeff Miller. (Not sure, but I think he picked it up from an old Fine Woodworking article.)Take a few scraps of wood, and cut a 30 degree chamfer on the lower third. Cut a steeper angle on the upper portion, and then slice in a few random grooves. Glue six pieces together, and you’ve now got a piece from which thin slices can be chopped off, just like you’d slice off cookie dough. (You do cut your cookie dough with a band saw, right? Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

One tip: you’ll probably want to use epoxy or another adhesive with good gap-filling qualities, because it’s very hard to get a perfect 30 degree angle, and it’s hard to apply much clamping pressure.
Zoom Info
Wooden Snowflake Christmas Ornaments: Need to make a nice custom gift, but don’t have much time? Here’s a technique I learned, working for Jeff Miller. (Not sure, but I think he picked it up from an old Fine Woodworking article.)Take a few scraps of wood, and cut a 30 degree chamfer on the lower third. Cut a steeper angle on the upper portion, and then slice in a few random grooves. Glue six pieces together, and you’ve now got a piece from which thin slices can be chopped off, just like you’d slice off cookie dough. (You do cut your cookie dough with a band saw, right? Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

One tip: you’ll probably want to use epoxy or another adhesive with good gap-filling qualities, because it’s very hard to get a perfect 30 degree angle, and it’s hard to apply much clamping pressure.
Zoom Info
Wooden Snowflake Christmas Ornaments: Need to make a nice custom gift, but don’t have much time? Here’s a technique I learned, working for Jeff Miller. (Not sure, but I think he picked it up from an old Fine Woodworking article.)Take a few scraps of wood, and cut a 30 degree chamfer on the lower third. Cut a steeper angle on the upper portion, and then slice in a few random grooves. Glue six pieces together, and you’ve now got a piece from which thin slices can be chopped off, just like you’d slice off cookie dough. (You do cut your cookie dough with a band saw, right? Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

One tip: you’ll probably want to use epoxy or another adhesive with good gap-filling qualities, because it’s very hard to get a perfect 30 degree angle, and it’s hard to apply much clamping pressure.
Zoom Info
Wooden Snowflake Christmas Ornaments: Need to make a nice custom gift, but don’t have much time? Here’s a technique I learned, working for Jeff Miller. (Not sure, but I think he picked it up from an old Fine Woodworking article.)Take a few scraps of wood, and cut a 30 degree chamfer on the lower third. Cut a steeper angle on the upper portion, and then slice in a few random grooves. Glue six pieces together, and you’ve now got a piece from which thin slices can be chopped off, just like you’d slice off cookie dough. (You do cut your cookie dough with a band saw, right? Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

One tip: you’ll probably want to use epoxy or another adhesive with good gap-filling qualities, because it’s very hard to get a perfect 30 degree angle, and it’s hard to apply much clamping pressure.
Zoom Info
Wooden Snowflake Christmas Ornaments: Need to make a nice custom gift, but don’t have much time? Here’s a technique I learned, working for Jeff Miller. (Not sure, but I think he picked it up from an old Fine Woodworking article.)Take a few scraps of wood, and cut a 30 degree chamfer on the lower third. Cut a steeper angle on the upper portion, and then slice in a few random grooves. Glue six pieces together, and you’ve now got a piece from which thin slices can be chopped off, just like you’d slice off cookie dough. (You do cut your cookie dough with a band saw, right? Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

One tip: you’ll probably want to use epoxy or another adhesive with good gap-filling qualities, because it’s very hard to get a perfect 30 degree angle, and it’s hard to apply much clamping pressure.
Zoom Info

Wooden Snowflake Christmas Ornaments: Need to make a nice custom gift, but don’t have much time? Here’s a technique I learned, working for Jeff Miller. (Not sure, but I think he picked it up from an old Fine Woodworking article.)Take a few scraps of wood, and cut a 30 degree chamfer on the lower third. Cut a steeper angle on the upper portion, and then slice in a few random grooves. Glue six pieces together, and you’ve now got a piece from which thin slices can be chopped off, just like you’d slice off cookie dough. (You do cut your cookie dough with a band saw, right? Well, maybe not, but you get the idea.)

One tip: you’ll probably want to use epoxy or another adhesive with good gap-filling qualities, because it’s very hard to get a perfect 30 degree angle, and it’s hard to apply much clamping pressure.

Millers Falls Skew Block Plane: Previously I posted pics of a pair of badly rusted planes, purchased at a yard sale. Here’s the second of those planes, all cleaned up. It’s a nice tool, but it probably won’t see much use, since I already have a beautiful old Stanley low-angle block plane. Compared to the Stanley, the Millers Falls plane is a pain to adjust. The skewed blade is a nice idea, but doesn’t really matter to me, since I habitually hold planes at an angle anyway.

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